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We’d been wanting to do a family holiday in Ireland for years and so we finally did. I’d been to Dublin twice before for work visits and we wanted a more rural experience. On others’ recommendations, we started in the city of Cork. With some sleuthing and asking around, I realized that we weren’t far then from gorgeous Killarney National Park, and then it wasn’t far west from there to get to Valentia Island, where incidentally there is something amazing for palaeontology-lovers. There was no detering me at that point from visiting what I’d only read about. I’ll mainly let the images tell the story.

Stomach-Churning Rating: 0/10; fossils and scenery. Kick back and enjoy.

Island map- it really is that simple to get around! The harbour town of Portmagee is damned adorable.

Driving in (no I am the passenger; not taking photo while at the wheel!)- excitement level = 8 and building… “Tetrapod carpark” sign ratcheted up the excitement and was amusing.

Headed to the trail; excitement level = 9…

Looking down onto the site (on the right); excitement level = 9.5; beauty level = 9.5 too!

Now, the site of what is broadly accepted by experts as a ~Late Devonian tetrapod’s fossil trackway(s) was originally described by Stössel in 1995. To me, that feels like a recent discovery but it is 22 years ago. The only other well-preserved, widely-accepted, probably-terrestrial, Late Devonian tetrapod trackways are from the Genoa River site in Australia; described by Warren et al. in 1972. Those trackways even reveal some details of the fingers and toes; these do not. Other tracks are either isolated footprints of minimal scientific value/clarity, subaerial (i.e. underwater), not clearly tetrapod (or now argued to be arthropod or other origin), not Devonian, or controversial for reasons I won’t get into here. Clack and Lucas have reviewed the relevant evidence recently. So there are essentially two places in the world that you can visit to view tracks like these and it was a joy to go visit one set. (Easter Ross, Scotland may be a third site but it is reasonably disputed in age and maker)

There is a big “however,” however- Falkingham and Horner showed how lungfish can produce tracks (with fins and heads together) that look like these– so there is still uncertainty. Without finger and toe impressions, claims of discrete tetrapod tracks can be risky, and it would be wrong to say that the Valentia Island footprints are uncontroversially or 100% certainly tetrapod in origin, although they are Devonian and made by some sort of animal.

Stössel et al. also published a very recent update on these Valentia Island tracks with more information. I wish I’d come across that before I visited (oops!). That study reports on a total of nine(!) trackways from the area, adding to the 1995’s first one (the “Dohilla locality, Do 1”– see diagrams below), and describes them as Middle Devonian (with a radiometric dating of 385 million years old). I’m not enough of a geologist to evaluate that; prior reports had focused on Late Devonian or so.

Rippled sandstone example; near-shore preservation characteristic of the trackway area/Valentia Slate Formation. It’s an alluvial deposit (freshwater floodplain), interpreted to lie inland from the coastal marine deposits. Raindrop impressions and possible mudcracks on the plane of the tracks offer some support that the tracks were made on (moist) land.

The island has plenty of signs advertising the tracks as a tourist destination but happily(?) there are no knick-knack shops stocked with plush tetrapods, or other developments at or near the site. One simply winds down a very narrow road near a radio station and old lighthouse, and parks then walks to see the tracks. No fancy crap; just AWESOME sights to take in, and some good educational information.

Explanatory plaque at the viewing area. Pretty good!

Nice image of where Valentia Island was; although the 385 My age may be exaggerated. It’s not clear how old the tracks are but “Mid-to-Late Devonian” might suffice. Claims that they are the “oldest known” may still be contentious (see references above).

Explanatory signs on the peak above the shore. Given the likely tetrapod trackmakers like Acanthostega-style critters, the adult animal may have been able to breathe air with lungs and underwater with gills.

Enough exposition– let’s expose those tracks! (images can be clicked to enlarge)

My first close-up look at the tracks. Whoa! Small tracks are presumably hand (manus) impressions; larger ones are foot (pes). The tracks go in an alternating fashion (like a salamander’s walk) and the animal was probably going from the bottom-right toward the top-left. Moss and moisture obscured some of the prints that day, sadly. The tracks are oval, with the long axes perpendicular to the direction of travel. There are some pesky geological deformations of the trackway, faults, and other distortions. 145 footprints in total are reported from this one trackway!

Trackway as it turns to the left and gets harder to follow. John-shadow for ~scale. Frustratingly for me, a little rivulet was coming down the hill across the left side of the trackway and hiding much of the detail of the end.

Alternative view of the majority of the tracks; turned ~90 degrees from above two views.

Zoomed-in view of the tracks from head-on (opposite the view in other photos); i.e. western position looking east (ish). I added red and blue dots to roughly outline the right side of the main trackway (red) and the second one (blue), which crosses it and may have been made after it.

Even these nice trackways, viewed by an expert, take some unpacking. Here is some:

Diagram of known tracks at the site by Stössel et al. 2016.

Diagram at view site with extra tail (or body) drag trail crossing the main tracks; described later by Stössel.

I’m not at all a religious person and I don’t really like the term “spiritual” either, but this experience was emotional for me. Awe is certainly the best word to describe what I felt on viewing these tracks. The literature just doesn’t do them justice; nothing beats a first-person experience like this. We were lucky with excellent weather, too, and we were almost alone during the visit so there was pleasant silence in which to contemplate the tracks. I brought my copies of three papers on the trackways and, struggling with the wind, compared them with the visible tracks to understand what other scientists had seen. That amplified the experience enormously for me.

Even if they turn out to be non-tetrapod or younger or something less exciting (“sham-rock”?), it was thrilling to see the Valentia Island tracks and think about what happened >350 million years ago when they were made by our very distant cousins, along the land-water interface of space and time.

(I also feel bad for online reviewers that were disappointed with the site- it’s hard to grasp the scientific importance and/or accept the evidence, even with the decent information available on-site. Even if people know the nice fossil record of dinosaurs, they may not know how good the fossil record of early tetrapods is and how confidently we can figure out what happened in the Devonian emergence of tetrapods onto land. But some visitors clearly got it.)

And, looking at the site myself, I realized how many more tracks might be buried under the cliffs of the site- the first trackway emerges from under a cliff and thus must still be preserved for some distance underground, awaiting future exposure. What more might we learn about that single animal and others that made tracks around the same time? I hope to live to find out. I feel a personal connection now to these tracks, left pondering what story they preserve– and hide. I’m glad I’m able to share my own story with you, and encourage you to make the visit yourself!

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Construction of the Phyletisches Museum in Jena, Germany began on Goethe’s birthday on August 28, 1907. The Art Nouveau-styled museum was devised by the great evolutionary biologist, embryologist and artist/howthefuckdoyousummarizehowcoolhewas Ernst Haeckel, who by that time had earned fame in many areas of research (and art), including coining the terms ontogeny (the pattern of development of an organism during its lifetime) and phylogeny (the pattern of evolution of lineages of organisms through time) which feature prominently in the building’s design and exhibits (notice them intertwined in the tree motif below, on the front of the museum). Ontogeny and phylogeny, and the flamboyant artistic sensibility that Haeckel’s work exuded, persist as themes in the museum exhibits themselves. Haeckel also came up with other popular words such as Darwinism and ecology, stem cell, and so on… yeah the dude kept busy.

Cavorting frogs from Haeckel's masterpiece Kunstformen der Natur (1904).

Cavorting frogs from Haeckel’s masterpiece Kunstformen der Natur (1904).

I first visited the Phyletisches Museum about 10 years ago, then again this August. Here are the sights from my latest visit: a whirlwind ~20 minute tour of the museum before we had to drive off to far-flung Wetzlar. All images are click-tastic for embiggenness.

Stomach-Churning Rating: 3/10 for some preserved specimens. And art nouveau.

Willkommen!

Willkommen!

Frog ontogeny, illustrated with gorgeous handmade ?resin? models.

Frog ontogeny, illustrated with gorgeous handmade ?resin? models.

Fish phylogeny, illustrated with lovely artistry.

Phylogeny of Deuterostomia (various wormy things, echinoderms, fish and us), illustrated with lovely artistry.

Phylogeny of fish and tetrapods.

Phylogeny of fish and tetrapods.

Slice of fossil fish diversity.

Slice of fossil fish diversity.

Plenty of chondryichthyan jaws and bodies.

Plenty of chondrichthyan jaws/chondrocrania, teeth and bodies.

Awesome model of a Gulper eel (Saccopharyngiformes).

Awesome model of a Gulper Eel — or, evocatively, “Sackmaul” auf Deutsch (Saccopharyngiformes).

Lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii)- great assortment.

Lobe-finned fishes (Sarcopterygii)- great assortment including a fossil coelacanth.

Lungfish body/model and skeleton.

Lungfish body and skeleton.

Coelacanth!

Coelacanth!

Coelacanth staredown!

Coelacanth staredown!

Fire salamander! We love em, and the museum had several on display- given that we were studying them with x-rays, seeing the skeleton and body together here in this nice display was a pleasant surprise.

On into tetrapods– a Fire Salamander (Salamandra salamandra)! We love ’em, and the museum had several on display- given that we were studying them with x-rays, seeing the skeleton and body together here in this nice display was a pleasant surprise.

A tortoise shell and skeleton, with a goofball inspecting it.

A tortoise shell and skeleton, with a goofball inspecting it.

In a subtle nod to recurrent themes in evolution, the streamlined bodies of an ichthyosaur and cetacean shown in the main stairwell of the museum, illustrating convergent evolution to swimming locomotor adaptations.

In a subtle nod to recurrent themes in evolution, the streamlined bodies of an ichthyosaur and cetacean shown in the main stairwell of the museum, illustrating convergent evolution to swimming adaptations.

Phylogeny of reptiles, including archosaurs (crocs+birds).

Phylogeny of reptiles, including archosaurs (crocs+birds).

Gnarly model of an Archaeopteryx looks over a cast of the Berlin specimen, and a fellow archosaur (crocodile).

Gnarly model of an Archaeopteryx looks over a cast of the Berlin specimen, and a fellow archosaur (crocodile). The only extinct dinosaur on exhibit!

Kiwi considers the differences in modern bird palates: palaeognathous like it and fellow ratites/tinamous (left), and neognathous like most living birds.

Kiwi considers the differences in modern bird palates: palaeognathous like it and fellow ratites/tinamous (left), and neognathous like most living birds.

Echidna skeleton. I can't get enough of these!

Echidna skeleton. I can’t get enough of these!

Skulls of dugong (above) and manatee (below).

Skulls of dugong (above) and manatee (below), Sirenia (seacows) closely related to elephants.

Fetal manatee. Awww.

Fetal manatee. Awww.

Adult Caribbean manatee, showing thoracic dissection.

Adult Caribbean manatee, showing thoracic dissection.

Hyraxes, which Prof. Martin Fischer, longtime curator of the Phyletisches Museum, has studied for many years.  Rodent-like elephant relatives.

Hyraxes, which Prof. Martin Fischer, longtime curator of the Phyletisches Museum, has studied for many years. Rodent-like elephant cousins.

Old exhibit at the Phyletisches Museum, now gone: Forelimbs of an elephant posed in the same postures actually measured in African elephants, for the instant of foot touchdown (left pic) and liftoff (right pic). Involving data that we published in 2008!

Old exhibit at the Phyletisches Museum, now gone: Forelimbs of an elephant posed in the same postures actually measured in African elephants, for the instant of foot touchdown (left pic) and liftoff (right pic). Involving data that we published in 2008!

Gorilla see, gorilla do. Notice "bent hip, bent knee" vs. "upright modern human" hindlimb postures in the two non-skeletal hominids.

Eek, primates! Gorilla see, gorilla do. Notice the primitive “bent hip, bent knee” vs. the advanced “upright modern human” hindlimb postures in the two non-skeletal hominids.

Phylogeny of select mammals, including the hippo-whale clade.

Phylogeny of artiodactyl (even-toed) mammals, including the hippo-whale clade.

Hand (manus) of the early stem-whale Ambulocetus.

Hand (manus) of the early stem-whale Ambulocetus.

Carved shoulderblade (scapula) of a bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus), which apparently Goethe owned. Quite a relic!

Carved shoulderblade (scapula) of a bowhead whale (Balaena mysticetus), which apparently Goethe owned (click to emwhalen and read the fine print). Quite a relic!

One of Haeckel's residences. There is also a well-preserved house of his that one can visit, but I didn't make it there.

One of Haeckel’s residences, across the street from the museum. There is also a well-preserved house of his that one can visit, but I didn’t make it there. I heard it’s pretty cool.

Jena is tucked away in a valley in former East Germany, with no local airport for easy access- but get to Leipzig and take a 1.25 hour train ride and you’re there. Worth a trip! This is where not just ontogeny and phylogeny were “born”, but also morphology as a modern, rigorous discipline. Huge respect is due to Jena, and to Haeckel, whose quotable quotes and influential research still resonate today, in science as well as in art.

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A photo blog post for ya here! I went to Dublin on a ~28 hour tour, for a PhD viva (now-Dr Xia Wang; bird feather/flight evolution thesis) earlier this month. And I made a beeline for the local natural history museum (National Museum of Ireland, Natural History building) when I had free time. So here are the results!

Stomach-Churning Rating: Tame; about a 1/10 for most, but I am going to break my rule about showing human bodies near the end. Just a warning. The bog bodies were too awesome not to share. So that might be 4/10-8/10 depending on your proclivities. They are dry and not juicy or bloody, and don’t look as human as you’d expect.

Simple Natural History museum entrance area.

Simple Natural History museum entrance area.

Adorable frolicking topiaries outside the NHM.

Adorable frolicking topiaries outside the NHM.

Inside, it was a classical Victorian-style, dark wood-panelled museum stuffed with stuffed specimens. It could use major refurbishment, but I do love old-fashioned exhibits. Get on with it and show us the animals; minimize interpretive signage and NO FUCKING INTERACTIVE COMPUTER PANELS! So by those criteria, I liked it. Some shots of the halls: hall2 hall1 hall3 hall4 hall5 hall6 And on to the specimens!

Giant European deer ("Irish elk"). I looked at these and thought, "why don't we see female deer without antlers ever? then noticed one standing next to these; photo was crappy though. :(

Giant European deer (“Irish elk”). I looked at these and thought, “why don’t we see female deer without antlers ever? then noticed one standing next to these (you can barely see it in back); too bad my photo is crappy.

Superb mounted skeleton of giraffe (stuffed skin was standing near it).

Superb mounted skeleton of giraffe (stuffed skin was standing near it).

A sheep or a goat-y thingy; I dunno but it shows off a nice example of the nuchal ligament (supports the head/neck).

A sheep-y or a goat-y beastie; I dunno but it shows off a nice example of the nuchal ligament (supports the head/neck).

Yarr, narwhals be internet gold!

Yarr, narwhals be internet gold!

Giant blown glass models of lice!

Giant blown glass models of lice!

Who doesn't like a good giant foramanifera image/models? Not me.

Who doesn’t like a good giant foramanifera image/model?

"That's one bigass skate," I murmured to myself.

“That’s one bigass skate,” I murmured to myself.

"That's one bigass halibut," I quipped.

“That’s one bigass halibut,” I quipped.

Tatty basking shark in entry hall.

Tatty basking shark in entry hall.

Irish wolfhound, with a glass sculpture of its spine hanging near it, for some reason.

Irish wolfhound, with a glass sculpture of its spine hanging near it, for some reason.

Stand back folks! The beaver has a club!

Stand back everyone! That beaver has a club!

Skull of a pilot whale/dolphin.

Skull of a pilot whale/dolphin.

Nice anteater skeleton and skin.

Nice anteater skeleton and skin.

Nice anteater skeleton and skin.

Nice wombat skeleton and skin.

Sad display of a stuffed rhino with the horn removed, and signage explaining the problem of thefts of those horns from museum specimens of rhinos worldwide.

Sad display of a stuffed rhino with the horn removed, and signage explaining the problem of thefts of those horns from museum specimens of rhinos worldwide.

But then the stuffed animals started to get to me. Or maybe it was the hangover. Anyway, I saw this…
creepy proboscis (1) creepy proboscis (2)

A proboscis monkey mother who seemed to be saying “Hey kid, you want this yummy fruit? Tough shit. I’m going to hold it over here, out of reach.” with a disturbing grimace. That got me thinking about facial expressions in stuffed museum specimens of mammals more, and I couldn’t help but anthropomorphize as I toured the rest of the collection, journeying deeper into surreality as I progressed. What follows could thus be employed as a study of the Tim-Burton-eseque grimaces of stuffed sloths. Click to emslothen.

sloths (1) sloths (5)sloths (4) sloths (3) sloths (2)

Tree anteater has a go at the awkward expression game.

Tree anteater has a go at the awkward expression game.


This completed my tour of the museum; there were 2 more floors of specimens but they were closed for, sigh, say it with me… health and safety reasons. Balconies from which toddlers or pensioners or drunken undergrads could accidentally catapult themselves to their messy demise upon the throngs of zoological specimens below. But the National Museum’s Archaeology collection was just around the block, so off I went, following whispered tales of bog bodies. There will be a nice, calm, pretty photo, then the bodies, so if peaty ~300 BCE cadavers are not your cup of boggy tea, you can depart this tour now and lose no respect.

Impressive entrance to the National Museum's Archaeology building.

Impressive entrance to the National Museum’s Archaeology building.

The bog bodies exhibit is called “Kingship and Sacrifice“. It is packed with cylindrical chambers that conceal, and present in a tomb-like enclosed setting, the partial bodies of people that were killed and then tossed in peat bogs as honoraria for the ascension of a new king. The peaty chemistry has preserved them for ~2300 years, but in a dessicated, contorted state. The preservation has imparted a mottled colouration and wrinkled texture not far off from a Twix chocolate bar’s. Researchers have studied the bejesus out of these bodies (including 3D medical imaging techniques) and found remarkable details including not just wounds and likely causes of death (axes, strangling, slit throats etc) but also clothing, diet, health and more.

Here they are; click to (wait for it)… emboggen:

BogBodies (1) BogBodies (2) BogBodies (3) BogBodies (4) BogBodies (5) BogBodies (6)

Did you find the Celtic armband on one of them?

Finally (actually this happened first; my post is going back in time), I visited UCD’s zoology building for the PhD viva and saw a few cool specimens there, as follows:

Giant deer in UCD zoology building foyer.

Giant deer in UCD zoology building foyer, with a lovely Pleistocene landscape painted on the wall behind it.

Sika deer in awkward posture in Univ Coll Dublin zoology building's foyer.

Sika deer in an awkward posture (what is it supposed to be doing?) in Univ Coll Dublin zoology building’s foyer.

The pose of this ?baboon? struck me as very peculiar, and menacing- reminiscent of a vampire bat's pose, to me.

The pose of this ?baboon?mandrill struck me as very peculiar and menacing- reminiscent of a vampire bat’s pose.

A whole lotta chicken skeletons in a UCD teaching lab.

A whole lotta chicken skeletons in a UCD teaching lab.

After the viva we went out for some nice Chinese food and passed some Dublin landmarks like this:

Trinity College entrance, I think.

Trinity College entrance, I think.Former Irish Parliament; now the Bank of Ireland.

And we wandered into a very posh Irish pub called the Bank (on College Green), which displayed this interesting specimen, as well as some other features shown below:

Replica of illuminated old Gaelic manuscript.

Replica of illuminated 9th Century gospel manuscript “The Book of Kells”, with gorgeous Celtic art.

Vaults near toilets in the Bank pub.

Vaults near toilets in the Bank pub. Almost as cool as having giant freezers down there.

Nice glass ceiling of the Bank pub.

Nice glass ceiling of the Bank pub.

And Irish pub means one big, delicious thing to me, which I will finish with here– much as I finished that night off:

Ahhh...

Ahhh… ice cold.

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